Advanced Aperture: Importing and Organizing Files - Photography Tutorial


Aperture is Apple’s professional photography application. It has many strengths and roles in a digital photographer’s workflow including RAW file decoding, image adjustment and book design to name but a few. Today we are going to demonstrate Aperture’s powerful file management options through a combination of written examples and video screencasts! - View Tutorial »


submitted: 5 years and 1792 days ago


Tags:advanced aperture files importing organizing
Submitted by Giulia - 171 Views
Publisher: photo.tutsplus.com

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